EQUESTRIAN CLASS

Cain’s Quest is one of the longest and most gruelling snowmobile races in the world. A biannual endurance event that challenges teams with a 3100 km trek through the rugged winter terrain that defines Canada’s north eastern corner, Newfoundland & Labrador.

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“… 3100KM trek…”

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For many riders, just crossing the starting line is a major accomplishment. Cain’s Quest is a costly and time-consuming affair that requires extraordinary planning and team building skills. Equipment must be purchased and tested, routes are analysed, gas depots are established, and an arsenal of supplies and personnel need delivery and housing.

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“… extraordinary planning and team building…”

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Once on the snow, the course itself presents an entirely different level of difficulty and the brutal realization that many participants will be forced to withdraw within the first 48 hours and few will manage to complete the race, let alone win it. Riders must endure brutally cold temperatures, hungry polar bears, jagged sea and drift ice, natural obstacles, and of course the mental strength to adhere to a plan while making constant adjustments on the fly.

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“… once on the snow…”

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Teams must stop at 17 different check points, many imposing mandatory rests which can delay departures and necessitate night rides in order to complete legs within the maximum time allowance. Even the slightest delay creates compounding effects that can be devastating to the racers strategy.

And yet this week, Team 33, featuring veteran rider Sheldon Wiseman and Boondockers original Team Rider, Brian Seaward – made an incredibly gracious gesture when they held back at Lodge Bay to allow their closest competitor to pass them and claim the first-place position at the half way point of the race.

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“… Boondockers team rider Brian Seaward…”

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Well ahead of the remaining teams, they’d been speeding neck and neck for days, developing a mutual respect for their competitors, a shared sense of accomplishment, and most importantly, the realization that this particular “Pole” would mean far more to the community if a home town racer greeted the roaring crowd of family and friends.

Needles to say, everyone’s a winner when you truly appreciate the nature of the snowmobiling community and a Boondockers respect for faithful fans and their enduring support.

Great job lads

Sweat your brains out!